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June 4, 2012

Meme of the Day: Reverse Mirror Images


If your dominant view of politics is that both parties are in the tank to the monied class, these last two days were for you.

First there was the NYT front page article (Candidates Have College, Spicy Chicken and ‘Star Trek’ in Common) comparing the backgrounds and personalities of Obama and Romney. Conclusion, they could be cousins. Not that these two overly cerebral types would be all that fun at a bar-b-que, but they would probably bond over chicken. (Not fried. Grilled, and skinless.)

And then we had Bill Clinton telegraphing his close ties to all those Clinton Inc. pals in the private equity biz, defending Romney’s “sterling” record at Bain. (Because it’s all about the sterling, right?) Then Clinton flipped back to the fold yesterday with three fundraisers for Obama in NYC as if the previous remarks never happened. (Fundraising tally: the first raised $2 mil from 50 people at the home of a hedge fund manager. The second raised $1.25 mil from 500 people. The third raised $425,000 from 1,700 people.)

But then, how many words are necessary when some good photo editing can get the point across. From Sunday’s print edition: the men are reverse mirror images.

Come to think of it, Obama and Clinton sort of set up the same effect.

(photo: Carolyn Kaster/AP caption: Former President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama shake hands after speaking during a campaign event at the Waldorf Astoria, Monday, June 4, 2012, in New York.)

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