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March 11, 2012

Fukushima +1

For those who followed our tsunami and Fukushima coverage here and at Tumblr, you’ll recognize this photo as one of our earliest, capturing the legacy the nuke disaster seemed to immediately bestow on Japan’s next generation. Today, marking the year anniversary of the catastrophe, this photo feels like its electronic cousin, emblematic of how that invisible malignancy — as “the new normal” — has been hung around the next generation’s neck.

(photo: Toru Hanai/Reuters caption: A student wears a radiation monitor on his shirt at Omika Elementary School, near the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Minamisoma, Fukushima prefecture, on March 8, 2012.)

  • bks

    I thought it was a new fashion fad.  Not just to leave the price tag on the shirt but to leave the anti-theft device on it, too.

        –bks
     

    • http://www.bagnewsnotes.com Michael Shaw

      Ironic association, though not a surprising one. You can’t see radiation but as citizen-consumers, we are all well trained to notice products, fashion, brands. Maybe the real outrage here: no swoosh or little polo guy.

  • http://www.bagnewsnotes.com Michael Shaw

    Ironic association, though not a surprising one. You can’t see radiation but as citizen-consumers, we are all well trained to notice products, fashion, brands. Maybe the real outrage here: no swoosh or little polo guy.

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  • LanceThruster

    As an aside, I recently bought my home in the high desert from my pal Bernie the Attorney, who moved his family to New Zealand (the reason? He said the American public and leadership were becoming progressively “meaner and stupider” and didn’t want to be around when it went “critical”).

    He subsequently wrote in a panic that he was notified by the cargo shipping company that every single on of his possessions was possibly contaminated by radiation from Fukushima and that they would not be liable as it would be basically designated an “act of God.”

    They later allowed his cargo through, not because he suspects they found it not contaminated, but rather just upped the benchmark for what is considered an acceptable reading.

    I imagine there is probably something similar going on regarding the data collected from these dosimeters.

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