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June 18, 2009

“Meet Mr. Mousavi”

Mousavi.jpg

Gracious. Obviously intellectual. A little shy around the camera. At home (and amiably desperate for shelf space).

This introduction was clearly step 1 in an up-close-and-personal introduction of Mousavi to the western world. And even if it’s speculative to draw conclusions about the man from TIME’s slideshow, “Behind the Scenes with Mousavi,” it’s certainly a more welcome and welcoming picture of a potential Iranian president, one that makes us want to to like him (even posing before Ayatollah Khomeini) almost simply for suiting our own media vernacular.

(Companion shot here.)

(Revised 8:am EST)

(image: Mohammad Farnood)

  • Tena

    One can see why there’s such turmoil over this – he looks like someone who is thoughtful and reasonable and even nice, in an avuncular or professorial way. I know he was one of the architects of the ‘79 revolution and he’s not really all that different from any of the rest of them, from what I read. But there is clearly something about the man that is inspiring and it comes through in his pictures. His face is very kind – let’s just put it that way. He doesn’t look like a politician – and Ahmadinejad does.

  • johanna

    Okay, this is where this site gets dopey. Mousavi in 1989 called for the murder of Salman Rushdie, for the carrying out of the fatwa. He has called Israel a cancerous tumor and called for its removal. He has routinely referred to the US as the great Satan (okay, I guess that doesn’t count) and his hands are bloody. His face is kind….? Hey, Jeffrey Dahmer was a good looking guy. The best that can be said of him is that he is a vehicle or focal point for a popular uprising that is far worthier than he is. The facts of what someone has done count, and those facts often cannot be read on the face or in a room’s decor.

  • Tena

    I think I agree and I think I said as much in my comment. But you cannot avoid how you react to the pictures of the man and that’s how I react.

  • johanna

    But you can control how you react. There’s really no objective standard of looking kindly. That is something you have projected onto him. Really, could an active participant in a regime that routinely stones women and is known to be corrupt to the nth degree, could such a person actually be kindly?

  • G Hazeltine

    Michael, you are letting yourself be played.

  • yg

    i’d like to hear more of this trend of former sons of the revolution now turned reformers and how prevalent that is. sounds like the reverse of neo-conism. there is even a cleric now calling for a separation of mosque and state.

  • yg

    oops, make that father or founders of the revolution, mousavi being one of them. the sons were the next generation after, like amadinejad, who fought the iraq/iran war.

  • Marzie

    This stoning women is not actually happening anymore, as the rule does not exist any more( its quite recent) and Musavi is not responsible for all regimes fault. I’m from Iran and I follow news both from net and our own tv and foreigners and I’m also living here and so I hate people so distanced from every thing comment on subjects they do not enough about. What’s happening here is more complicated than u can ever imagine!
    Musavi is a respectable guy.

  • Marzie

    they do not KNOW enough about.

  • Marzie

    Ahmadinejad fought in that war? heh, funny joke!

  • Marzie

    Those fought in that war were respectable guys, they had no other choice and they were defending our country and our people, we didnt attack Iraq, we were forced to defend and all those guys got killed or participated in the war are great. Don’t put that bastard amongst them please.

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